Traveller Store CotI Features New Posts Mark Forums Read Register


Go Back TravellerRPG.com > Citizens of the Imperium > Other Versions of Traveller > Classic Traveller

Classic Traveller Discussion on the granddaddy of them all, Classic Traveller!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old June 9th, 2007, 12:37 AM
Supplement Four's Avatar
Supplement Four Supplement Four is offline
Citizen: SOC-14
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Houston
Posts: 9,343
Gallery : 0
Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++
Post

TRAVELLER Special Supplement 4: Sensors

POST One - Introduction.




Space is vast, almost entirely empty, and very, very cold such that even gases freeze solid. A vessel's drives emit enormous energy when providing any reasonable thrust, thus the energy from a manuvering ship is very easy to detect against the super-cold background of space.

But, even when a vessel ceases use of its maneuver drive, a reasonable internal temperature must be maintained to protect the crew. And a vessel uses its fusion power plant to support all manner of equipment including the ship's life support system, it's computer system, and a multitude of other power-hungry essential systems--all of which emit heat as a waste by-product. This heat must be shunted to the exterior of the vessel in order to keep the excess from cooking the crew and frying components. Even a military design stealth ship must be crafted in such a way that these types of issues are addressed. All vessels (if ship's systems are used) radiate energy which can be detected using the advanced sensors available in Known Space. Thus, it is generally easy to detect the presence of other starships and extact a fair amount of information about other vessels based on energy emissions.

There isn't much to hide behind in space, but space also isn't completely empty. Background noise, such as that emitted from a gas giant's magnetosphere or from the radiation of the system's star, can interfere with sensor readings. The limiting component of a vessel's detection capability is its ability to filter this background noise, and the quality of this process is directly related to the expertise of the sensor operator, the equipment he uses, and the vessel's computing power.








NOTE: These sensor rules are a revision of the rules I posted earlier. Besides my original work, I draw upon sensor information described in the Classic Traveller basic rules and Grand Survey as well as CT articles in Pegasus and White Dwarf magazines. The description of sensors above is inspired by a paragraph in Power Projection: FLEET.

Last edited by Supplement Four; June 28th, 2007 at 06:08 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old June 9th, 2007, 02:03 AM
Supplement Four's Avatar
Supplement Four Supplement Four is offline
Citizen: SOC-14
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Houston
Posts: 9,343
Gallery : 0
Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++
Post

TRAVELLER Special Supplement 4: Sensors

POST Two - Transponders.




A transponder is a device that continually broadcasts a vessel's ID, position, and relevant information. All vessels within the Imperium (and in most places outside the Imperium as well) are required to carry transponders as part of the vessel's standard equipment, by Imperial Law. When a ship emerges from J-Space, it is bombarded by multiple contacts in a busy system--the transponder signals broadcasting from each vessel. Transponders are considered a component of the Bridge assembly when starship/spaceship construction is undertaken, and transponders also operate as the vessel's "black box", which can be ejected from the vessel should tragedy befall the ship.

Military vessels are typically equipped with transponders that may be altered to broadcast variable ID information. These vessels also have the ability to cease transponder transmission altogether. All civilian ships, though, must incorporate a transponder that constantly broadcasts and cannot be silenced. World governments must apply for special dispensation from the Imperial government in order to operate vessels with military grade transponders at distances greater than High Orbit. Under certain circumstances, Scout ships and other special-case vessels are granted this dispensation if legitimate need is demonstrated.

Military grade transponders, of course, find their way to the grey and black markets, and this equipment can be had for the right price at the right port when speaking with the right dealer. Possession of a military grade transponder without dispensation, though, is an Imperial class crime punishable by imprisonment or vessel forfeiture or both. Transponder inspections are common as part of IAP ("Eye-ap", or Incoming-Arrival Procedure) on many worlds inside the Imperium. One would think that corsairs with such a transponder would have an edge over the civilian vessels that the pirates prey upon (see pg. 15 of Supplement 4: Citizens of the Imperium), and in some respects, this does pose a problem to civilian traffic. But, it is perfectly legal to blast a vessel out of the spaceways if it approaches without a transponder signal. Corsair captains have learned to be more crafty, either by broadcasting a false signal or finding position on a target by hiding behind a moon/planet/asteroid/satellite in space. Wounded corsairs, though, find the number of worlds where port can be made sparse, and typically officials require their empty hands be filled with credits if they are to look the other way.








-------------------------------------------------
GAME RULE

A bonus -4 DM is applied to any detection throw when the target is active, and any vessel broadcasting a transponder signal is indeed considered to be active.




.

Last edited by Supplement Four; September 17th, 2017 at 06:25 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old June 9th, 2007, 05:44 AM
Supplement Four's Avatar
Supplement Four Supplement Four is offline
Citizen: SOC-14
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Houston
Posts: 9,343
Gallery : 0
Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++
Post

TRAVELLER Special Supplement 4: Sensors

[img]graemlins/alpha.gif[/img] POST Three - Basic Sensor Package.




The BSP (Basic Sensor Package) is a suite of both active and passive sensors included as basic components of the ship's Bridge assembly when starship/spaceship construction is undertaken. BSPs are available starting at TL 9.

--------------------
BSP SENSOR SUITE
--------------------</font>
  • EMS Active</font>
  • EMS Passive</font>
  • RADAR</font>
  • RADAR direction finder</font>
  • Radio direction finder</font>
  • LADAR</font>
  • MADAR</font>
  • Laser Sensors</font>
  • HRT</font>
The BSP's effective detection range is about one-half light-second. Bogeys that rig for silent running can be detected at half that range. Bogeys in orbit can be detected at 1/4 that range. Bogeys rigged for silent running and in orbit of a world can only be detected at 1/8 that range. Once a target is detected, though, it can be tracked up to a distance of three light seconds (or its initial detection range, whichever is longer).

</font><blockquote>code:</font><hr /><pre style="font-size:x-small; font-family: monospace;">BSP Grade Close Short Long Extreme
------------- ------ ------ ----- --------
Standard (km) 100K 150K 300K 600K
(LS) 0.33 0.50 1.00 2.00
Military (km) 300K 600K 900K 1200K
(LS) 1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00</pre>[/QUOTE]Military grade sensors have an effective range of about four times that of standard grade sensors, though military grade sensors are typically restricted and unavailable to those vessels built outside of a military organization. Exceptions do exist, and such is the case with many Scout craft.








Sensor Scans detect other vessels (and objects). A scan provides general information about the object scanned.

The first activity normally conducted after tumbling back into N-Space from a jump is a sensor scan in order to detect nearby objects. Since the vast majority of spacecraft employ constant-signal transponders, becoming alert to nearby vessels is usually instantaneous and immediate.

Sensor Locks provide detailed information about objects detected with sensor scans.

Objects must be detected first from a scan before they can be locked, and sensor locks are required for an enemy vessel to be targeted in space combat.

An active sensor is one that emits a signal then reads that signal once it returns after bouncing off a detected object. RADAR works this way (as does the flashlight when flashed into a dark room). A passive sensor is one that simply detects transmissions without emitting any signals of its own. Streetlight sensors work this way (and so does the naked eye).

Passive sensors can be used for both sensor scans and sensor locks, but passives are better suited to scans.

Some active sensors can be used for both sensor scans and sensor locks, but many active sensors are "directional" instead of "broadbeam" and therefore are only capable of sensor locks. Active sensors are better suited to sensor locks than passive sensors, and active sensors typically provide more detail about a detected object than a passive lock will provide.

Passive sensors typically have much greater range than active sensors as active sensors must send a signal out and wait for it to bounce back before the return can be read. (Passive sensors receive incoming signals in half the time.)

Passive sensors that can be used in both sensor scans and sensor locks have the capability of being focused in a narrow tight beam. For example, the Passive EMS sensor will receive incoming data omni-directionally when in scan mode but can also be focused (as a telephoto lens used on a camera) on a narrow target. This latter setting of the sensor is used for passive sensor locks.

Since vessels are typically continually broadcasting transponder information, making the ship an active target to enemies, active sensors are used just as often as passives (Military vessels rely slightly more on passive sensors). The ship's computer functions in collecting data reported by the various sensors and presenting it in a form that is relatively easy to digest by the sensor operator. More powerful computer systems provide faster, better quality results than computers ranked with lower model numbers.








RADAR is an active sensor that detects objects by emitting radio energy across wide angles before detecting that energy when it bounces back from distant objects. Radar can be used for active sensor locks, but is most often used for active sensor scans.

LADAR is a similar active sensor to RADAR, except that it uses a tight beam laser rather than radio energy to bounce light off a target. Sand from sandcasters can make use of a LADAR less effective. And, LADAR can only be used for sensor locks (not sensor scans).

MADAR is a similar active sensor to LADAR, using a microwave signal. It, too, is a tight beam active sensor that can only be used for locks but not scans.

HRT is a High-Resolution Thermal detecting device. It's a passive sensor that detects targets by their emmitted infrared radiation (heat). HRT can be used for either a passive sensor scan or a passive sensor lock.

EMS Active is an advanced version of RADAR which incorporates the use of wavelengths other than radio and includes sophisticated computerized image enhancement of the electro-magnetic spectrum. EMS Active can be used as either an active sensor scan or active sensor lock.

EMS Passive is an advanced (incorporates a camera) passive sensor that has the capabilities of HRT plus EMS direction finders and computerized image enhancement. EMS can be used for either passive sensor scans or passive sensor locks.

EMS Frequency Bands are longwave radio (ex: power line networks), shortwave radio (ex: televison), microwave radio (ex: all-weather RADAR), heat and infra-red (ex: any heat source), visible light (ex: light from stars), ultraviolet light (ex: artificial light), X-rays (ex: emitted from gas giants), and Gamma rays (ex: emitted from nuclear explosions including that in stars). A spectrometer is a piece of an EMS sensor, providing spectral analysis on all wavelengths of light.

Laser Sensors, RADAR Direction Finders, and Radio Direction Finders are all passive sensors that can locate and classify energy emissions, indicating size and power level status. These sensors can only be used in passive sensor scans.

Tight Beam sensors, like LADAR, are indeed active sensors. But, because of their tightbeam nature, a vessel may be able to rig for silent running without being considered active and still use tight beam active sensors. The reason for this is their relatively low energy output (nothing when compared to the ship's power plant) and the fact that an enemy vessel has to cross the beam in order to detect it. Note that a ship using tight beam sensors will be considered active by the target ship!

Visual Range is generally considered to be around 10,000 km, but this does not mean an enemy vessel can be spotted from inside a vessel, through a port, at that distance with the naked eye (actual naked eye range is much less). This refers to the HRT and EMS sensors' ability to use a telephoto lens, spectral imaging and computer enhancement to report an actual image of target craft. At any range beyond 10,000 km, the HRT and EMS sensors begin to contruct computer aided "guesses" instead of reporting the target's actual image. Though, with longer amounts of time (more than one space combat round), the EMS sensor's spectrometer function can be used to report actual images from incredible distances.

Passive Sensors can have fantastic range, viewing into other galaxies if tuned properly and given enough time. The ranges described above, for both actives and passives, are provided with space combat in mind. When ship's sensors are used for other purposes, the GM should make a determination on the type of results the sensor reports.








This detail is presented for roleplaying purposes and GM reference only. As presented in the next post, the mechanics of these sensor rules call for a single, simple detection die roll. If successful, a sensor scan is made and all targets scanned are also considered target locked. These rules should also be used without die rolls--the information used as reference whenever sensor data is called for during a game.

For example, the densitometer (discussed later), HRT, and EMS arrays are important to a Navigator when plotting a course through the dangerous electro-magnetic and gravitational jetties of the upper atmosphere of a gas giant when skimming fuel.

The ship's densitometer is relied upon heavily when the Navigator informs the captain that the ship has passed through a planet's 100 diameter gravitational zone. (Vessels equipped with the BSP do not incorporate denistometers and thus must keep track of the 100 diameter limit by range finding.)

When a player asks for range to a target, in effect, that information is being reported by the LADAR. Missiles use the LADAR system as they fly towards their targets.

A lot of color can be added to a game by a GM who has a grasp of what jobs for which these sensors can be used. Yet, the game rules are kept simple, so that the game proceeds at a fast, furious, but fun pace. In short, GMs should use as much of, or as little as, this detail as is needed in their games.







-------------------------------------------------
GAME RULE

A light-second measures 300,000 km.

What the BSP will report: Target presence, position, and velocity. When detection is made using BSPs, GMs should give no information other than bogey presence, position, and trajectory. A GM providing more information than this should look closely at the type of information gleaned from a particular BSP sensor type before providing additional details.

Complications a GM may consider when reporting BSP results: Solar flares or strong planetary magnetic fields make scans difficult to perform with accuracy (allowing vessels to hide in these areas). Any type of overpowering radiation can interfere with scans (nuclear missile explosions, sensor jamming devices). Sandcaster clouds reflect light and may make sensor scans difficult. Dense materials will block X-rays and gamma rays. Active scans will almost certainly give away the position of the sensing ship to the enemy.

A situational DM a GM could spring on his players involves the LADAR having to detect a target through a cloud of sand. In a case like this, the same -3 DM penalty used for the ship's laser weapons would be appropriate for any LADAR based throws.

A maximum of four detection throws can be made by the sensor operator each space combat round. One detection throw is allowed per range category, and if detection is successful, then detection is considered automatic at all shorter ranges.




.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old June 9th, 2007, 06:18 AM
Judas Iscariot Judas Iscariot is offline
Citizen: SOC-10
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: San Francisco CA
Posts: 65
Gallery : 0
Judas Iscariot Citizen
Post

About detecting ships while in a system.

While it is true that a ship would stand out against teh background of cold space.

Space in a solar system is by no means "cold", especially if there are any gas giants, or a large hot star.

Magnetic fields will also obscure detection.

Also, it takes quite a while to go through all of the data from a sky survey to pick out the "object" that is brighter than others, and then you need to make sure that what you are seeing is not a normal astronomical phenomenon (Gamma-Ray Bursts, X-Rays from black holes, Super-Novae, a local explosion such as a collision of two asteroids, or interactions with a large magnetic field from a gas giant... etc...).

After that has been established, then you can get down to the business of investigating what it is.

Also, at the TLs we are talking about... It would be relatively easy for a ship to trail a line of superconductor out several thousand miles behind it to dissapate the heat it generates almost invisibly. Or, it could use those same superconductors to store the heat so that nothing is radiated...

Superconducting shields could shield both the ship and its exhaust gasses from almost all angles save for directly into the exhaust of the ship. Superconducting hulls would pretty much make the ship completely invisible to all sensors save for things like mass detectors, even neutrino detection would be difficult.


Another thing that I would like to ask about...

Why is there a separate listing for Radar and Radio Direction finders?

Both Radar and Radio are part of the same EM spectrum, and a "Radar" or "Radio" direction finder is basically a just a radio reciever with an antennae that allows it to detect the strength of a radio wave from a specific direction. Doesn't matter whether the source is a radio transmitter or a radar transmitter.

I have never understood whythese are separate peices of equipment.
__________________
The future is never what we make of it...
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old June 9th, 2007, 12:44 PM
Supplement Four's Avatar
Supplement Four Supplement Four is offline
Citizen: SOC-14
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Houston
Posts: 9,343
Gallery : 0
Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++
Post

Quote:
Originally posted by Matthew Bailey:
Space in a solar system is by no means "cold", especially if there are any gas giants, or a large hot star.
I knew someone would point this out. I should have mentioned it. People on EVA can fry as well as freeze.

But, there are more areas where they'll freeze.

Quote:
Magnetic fields will also obscure detection.
Now, I did mention this.

Quote:
Also, it takes quite a while to go through all of the data from a sky survey to pick out the "object" that is brighter than others, and then you need to make sure that what you are seeing is not a normal astronomical phenomenon (Gamma-Ray Bursts, X-Rays from black holes, Super-Novae, a local explosion such as a collision of two asteroids, or interactions with a large magnetic field from a gas giant... etc...).
Space combat rounds in Book 2 are 1000 seconds long. Space combat rounds in Book 5 are 20 minutes long.

A ship's navigator will be doing nothing else during a space combat scenario except reading and interpreting sensor data, feeding it to the gunners, updating bogey positions and vectors, fine-tuning the computer's guess as to what the ship is shooting at, etc.

Quote:
Also, at the TLs we are talking about...
BTW, I have purposely kept TL of equipment as a non-factor in these rules, even though I myself would argue for its importance, because these rules are meant to be used with Classic Traveller, including vessels from both Book 2 and Book 5. While Book 5 stats always list TL, it is not always clear the TL of a vessel designed using Book 2. Thus, I've omitted TL from these rules for that reason.

Quote:
Superconducting hulls would pretty much make the ship completely invisible to all sensors save for things like mass detectors, even neutrino detection would be difficult.
I haven't gotten there yet. The site was running so sluggish yesterday, I decided to wait a bit before I finished posting the rules.

Neutrino sensors and Densitometers are not part of the BSP. These are advanced sensors that can be added-on to vessels. I'll be covering these when I post the additional rules.

Quote:
Another thing that I would like to ask about...

Why is there a separate listing for Radar and Radio Direction finders?
In actuality, everything I listed under the BSP suite above are all components of a "EMS cluster". I list them separately to show GMs all the different types of jobs the sensors can do--and what to expect when using a particular sensor.




There's more of Special Supplement 4: Sensors to come!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old June 9th, 2007, 04:12 PM
Supplement Four's Avatar
Supplement Four Supplement Four is offline
Citizen: SOC-14
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Houston
Posts: 9,343
Gallery : 0
Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++
Post

TRAVELLER Special Supplement 4: Sensors

[img]graemlins/alpha.gif[/img] POST Four - Detection.




A vessel's navigator is typically the primary sensor operator, but data from ship's sensors can easily be routed to any command workstation. During battle, a navigator's primary responsibility is to interpret sensor readings, filter and feed data to the ship's gunners, and update the pilot with target plot and vector information. When a sensor scan is performed, the operator will focus on incoming data from four basic range categories: Close, Short, Long, and Extreme. Typically, a sensor operator will first focus on Extreme range data before interpreting Long range data, and then Short range data before Close range data.

GMs need not impose a throw when a sensor scan is performed. Description of what the operator interprets from the sensor data may be all that is necessary. But, if a throw is called for, use this simple rule:

DETECTION SUCCESS = THROW COMPUTER OR LESS

The number of dice used on the Detection Throw is determined by the sensor's range category.

</font><blockquote>code:</font><hr /><pre style="font-size:x-small; font-family: monospace;"> RANGE DICE
-------- -----
Close 1D -4
Short 1D
Long 2D
Extreme 3D</pre>[/QUOTE]Detection success is obtained when a number is thrown that is equal to or less than the vessel's computer model rating. Higher model computers are more sophisticated and thus are capable of faster, better quality filtering of incoming sensor data.

A sensor operator's expertise makes detection more likely, and to reflect this, a beneficial DM equal to the sensor operator's skill level is used on any Detection Throw.

Thus, a navigator with Sensor Ops-2, operating sensors on a vessel with a Model 1bis computer, will throw 3D -2 for 1 or less when making an Extreme range scan. A Long range scan would be made by throwing 2D -2 for 1 or less, and a Short range detection throw would be performed by throwing 1D -2 for 1 or less.

The maximum DM used on any Detection Throw is a -4 DM, with sensor operator expertise as the only exception. Sensor operators with Sensor Ops-5 or greater may use their full skill level when modifiying the Detection Throw.

Thus, continuing our example above, Close range scans are made by throwing 1D -4 for 1 or less.

Success on a Detection Throw indicates that a target is detected and locked. Ship's weapons may fire at any bogey for which the ship has a sensor lock (and thus at any bogey that has been detected). And, a sensor operator may attempt one scan in each range category every space combat round. If detection is successful at one range category, then detection is automatic at all shorter ranges.

Returning to the example above, a successful Detection Throw made at Long range means that any bogeys at Short or Close range are automatically detected as well.








-------------------------------------------------
GAME RULE

In actuality, ship's sensors (Passives) are always considered scanning. The Detection Throw represents the sensor operator's efforts in interpreting that data.

The Detection Throw is made by rolling the ship's computer model number or less. A single die, or two or more dice, may be used on the throw, depending on the type of scan being performed. The sensor operator's skill level is used as a DM to decrease the throw and make success more likely.

All Close range scans are performed using the maximum -4 DM. All Short range scans are made throwing the single die with any applicable DMs. All Long range scans are made by throwing two dice with any applicable DMs.

Sensor operators can attempt to stretch the sensing capability of the ship's sensors by making an expert, educated guess at data coming in from beyond long range. This procedure adds one light-second to the sensor's long range limit, and the scan is performed by throwing 3D for the ship's computer model or less, using any appropriate DMs.

The maximum DM applied to any sensor scan is a -4 DM. Sensor operators with Sensor Ops-5 or better are the only exception to the maxiumum modifier.

Vessels that use M-Drives, transponders, or active sensors are considered active targets. The maximum -4 DM is appropriate when scanning an active target at any range.

Detection success means automatic success at all closer range categories.

There is ample time during the 1000 second round of Book 2 space combat (or the 20 minutes round of Book 5 space combat) for the ship's navigator to conduct all four scans. Scans are performed during the ship's movement phase either before or after movement has been completed.

Operating ship's sensors during space combat is a full-time job. On vessels of greater than 200 tons displacement, crewmembers who operate ships sensors and perform another job (Pilot, for example) during space combat are considered as filling two crew positions per the rule on pg. 16 of Book 2. On vessels of 200 tons displacement or less, the ship's pilot can operate sensors and pilot the vessel without penalty.

Game masters may implement other DMs to the detection throw based on special circumstances occurring in a scenario.

A maximum of four detection throws can be made by the sensor operator each space combat round. One detection throw is allowed per range category, and if detection is successful, then detection is considered automatic at all shorter ranges.




.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old June 9th, 2007, 04:36 PM
Supplement Four's Avatar
Supplement Four Supplement Four is offline
Citizen: SOC-14
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Houston
Posts: 9,343
Gallery : 0
Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++
Post

TRAVELLER Special Supplement 4: Sensors

[img]graemlins/alpha.gif[/img] POST Five - Sensor Operation.




Sensor Ops is the skill denoting expertise in operating sensors and interpreting readings. There are several Traveller skills that provide expertise in sensor operation, but GMs may wish to consider replacements on character generation tables with the actual Sensor Ops skill.

</font><blockquote>code:</font><hr /><pre style="font-size:x-small; font-family: monospace;"> SKILL Sensor Ops
============ ====================
Navigation at same skill level
Pilot at skill minus one
Ship's Boat at skill minus one
Gunnery at skill minus two
Recon at skill minus one
Survey at same skill level</pre>[/QUOTE]Thus, a ship's navigator with Navigation-2 is considered to also have Sensor Ops-2. A gunner, on the other hand, with Gunnery-3, is considered to have Sensor Ops-1. And, a small craft pilot, with Ship's Boat-0, is also considered to have Sensor Ops-0.




.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old June 9th, 2007, 11:11 PM
Supplement Four's Avatar
Supplement Four Supplement Four is offline
Citizen: SOC-14
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Houston
Posts: 9,343
Gallery : 0
Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++
Post

TRAVELLER Special Supplement 4: Sensors

[img]graemlins/alpha.gif[/img] POST Six - Detect Program.




Detect is a software suite that interfaces with the ship's sensor systems and computer network to boost filtering ability and provide quality scrubbed data for the sensor operator. The program provides increased computer augmentation, probability readings, and automated data interpretation, aiding the operator in his judgements.

</font><blockquote>code:</font><hr /><pre style="font-size:x-small; font-family: monospace;"> SOFTWARE LIST
-------------------------
Space MCr Title
===== ===== =========
1 2. Detect-1
2 4. Detect-2
3 6. Detect-3
4 8. Detect-4
5 10. Detect-5</pre>[/QUOTE].








-------------------------------------------------
GAME RULE

The Detect program is governed by the normal computer programming rules.

The Detect program replaces the Sensor Ops skill, when the Detection Throw is made, with a DM equal to the program's rating.

Because the program is acting as the sensor operator in many respects, Detect-5 does break the maximum sensor modifier of -4, providing a -5 DM to Detection Throws, just as an operator with Sensor Ops-5 would.

Operators must have a minimum skill of Sensor Ops-0 in order to use the program. In addition, the sum of their Sensor Ops skill and EDU must be higher than the program's rating. Otherwise, the program cannot be used. (Ex: An operator with Sensor Ops-0 and EDU-4 is capable of using Detect-1, Detect-2, and Detect-3 only.)




.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old June 10th, 2007, 02:47 PM
Supplement Four's Avatar
Supplement Four Supplement Four is offline
Citizen: SOC-14
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Houston
Posts: 9,343
Gallery : 0
Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++
Post

TRAVELLER Special Supplement 4: Sensors

[img]graemlins/alpha.gif[/img] POST Seven - Sensor Locks.




This is an optional rule. Some GMs may decide this rule is a bit too persnickety. Others will embrace the additional importance it places on the sensor operator, his sensor scans, and the role of the ship's computer and sensor systems during space combat.

Under the standard rules described earlier, a vessel automatically obtains a sensor lock on all bogeys it detects. Thus, all targets may be fired upon as soon as they are detected.

This optional rule alters the standard sensor lock assumption in that the number of sensor locks that may be maintained at one time can never exceed the Model number of the ship's computer. Thus, a vessel with a Model 3 computer can obtain locks on up to three different bogeys at one time, and if there are more than three targets in the sky, that vessel may only fire at bogeys on which a sensor lock has been obtained. Bogeys that are detected but not locked are still tracked for position and velocity, but ship's weapons cannot be used against them.

When a bogey is detected, it is the sensor operator's choice to obtain a sensor lock on that target. If the maximum number of locks have been previously obtained, then the sensor operator may spare a previous lock in order to free up computer and sensor resouces to track the new target.








-------------------------------------------------
GAME RULE

A maximum of four detection throws can be made by the sensor operator each space combat round. One detection throw is allowed per range category, and if detection is successful, then detection is considered automatic at all shorter ranges.

Sensor locks may still be obtained upon first detection of a target, at the sensor operator's option. If the maximum number of bogeys are already being tracked, then the operator may give up one lock in order to lock the new target.

If a sensor operator wishes to change his sensor locks, he simply needs to perform a sensor scan, succeeding at a detection throw during the Sensors Phase of space combat (during the Movement Phase of Book 2 space combat or during the Range Determination Step of Book 5 space combat).

Sensor locks may be transferred from friendly vessels, communicated during the Sensors Phase of space combat.

Shifting Fire, as described on pg. 29 of Book 2, can only be performed against locked targets (a vessel with a Model 1 or 1bis computer cannot shift fire).

SIGNAL QUALITY: This additional optional rule allows GMs to use the result of the Detection throw as a measure of the quality of signal lock, or as a measure of the quality of the operator's interpretation of sensor data. In many cases, the result of the Detection throw will be 0, and this indicates 0% margin of error. When the result of the Detection throw is 1 or higher (and still equal to lower than the computer's model number), GMs can use that result to guage the quality of the scan. This would primarily be used for roleplaying purposes (not space combat).




.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old June 10th, 2007, 07:28 PM
Supplement Four's Avatar
Supplement Four Supplement Four is offline
Citizen: SOC-14
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Houston
Posts: 9,343
Gallery : 0
Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++Supplement Four Citizen++
Post

TRAVELLER Special Supplement 4: Sensors

[img]graemlins/alpha.gif[/img] POST Eight - Engineering Perception Package.




The EPP (Engineering Perception Package) is a combination of ugraded software and additional equipment meant to augment the BSP suite. It adds a neutrino sensor to the basic package, which is a passive sensor most often used in the detection of high energy sources.

The EPP will aid the sensor operator in determining the total displacement of a target vessel as well as displacement of the target's major components (M-Drive, J-Drive, and Power Plant). EPPs are available beginning at TL A.

</font><blockquote>code:</font><hr /><pre style="font-size:x-small; font-family: monospace;">EPP Grade Close Short Long Extreme
------------- ------ ------ ----- --------
Standard (km) 30K 60K 150K 450K
(LS) 0.10 0.20 0.50 1.50
Military (km) 150K 300K 600K 900K
(LS) 0.50 1.00 2.00 3.00</pre>[/QUOTE]Military grade EPPs have an effective range of about four times that of standard grade sensors. The EPP is an upgrade of the BSP, so BSP data will be reported at the BSP ranges described earlier.








Use chart below when incorporating EPPs into Book 2/Book 5 starship construction. TL is the minimum required TL for the package. Mass is in tons. EP is the Book 5 energy point requirement. Cost is in MCr.

</font><blockquote>code:</font><hr /><pre style="font-size:x-small; font-family: monospace;"> TL Mass EP Cost
--- ---- -- ----
EPP, standard grade A 2 1 1.5
EPP, military grade A 2 1 2.5</pre>[/QUOTE]Neutrino Sensors are a development of research into subatomic particles. High energy sources, such as fusion power plants, emit neutrinos, and a characteristic of the neutrino is that it travels in a straight line. The neutrino sensor, when detecting these subatomic particles, easily determines the direction of the source. Range is determined by dispersion of particles rather than by attenuation because of the great distances involved in space combat. Compared with other passive sensors, neutrino sensors have a relatively short range, and multiple readings taken over a long period of time may be required for quality readings.








-------------------------------------------------
GAME RULE

What the EPP will report: Target's displacement in dtons as well as the dtons of the target's M-Drive, Power Plant, and J-Drive. If High Guard is being used, it is the actual tonnage of the target's power plant that is reported rather than the USP power plant number (so that the vessel's TL cannot be determined).

Complications a GM may consider when reporting EPP results: If a target is directly in front of, or behind, a star, the star's neutrino emissions will mask the target's weaker emissions (starships can hide in sunspots). Targets that are close together may read as one big emission, making for fuzzy data reports (and multiple small vessels may be determined to be one large vessel). Readings from widely different positions (wide angle separation) make for better EPP reports.

One detection throw per range category (per space combat round) is allowed when using the ship's BSP, and if detection is successful, then detection is considered automatic at all shorter ranges. A maximum of four detection throws can be made by the sensor operator each space combat round. Therefore, should a sensor operator use the EPP suite, he must substitute an EPP detection throw for a BSP detection throw. (Ex: If a EPP detection throw is made at Short range, then a BSP detection throw cannot also be made at Short range.)




.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

This website and its contents are copyright ©2010- Far Future Enterprises. All rights reserved. Traveller is a registered trademark of Far Future Enterprises .
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright (c) 2010-2013, Far Future Enterprises. All Rights Reserved.