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Imperial Interstellar Scout Service Details of the worlds of the Imperium (and beyond).

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Old May 29th, 2006, 05:09 AM
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I'm sorry for my sketchy knowledge of astronomy, but I'd like to ahve some data on Globular and Opne clusters, their stellar densities, stellar characteristics (are they linked to nebulae in some cases as I recall?), and the locations of the closets ones to Sol.

Also, are there any disc-shaped small clusters?
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Old May 29th, 2006, 09:12 AM
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Hi !

The general answer: Wikipedia
You will find a pretty list of NGCs, Messier and Melotte objects as well as positional data and links to e.g. the SEDS archive with other tons of data.

Sadly, I do not know a fairly condensed list of near sol clusters.
But Hyades are pretty "near" (44 pc), as well as the Plejades (430 ly), NGC1432/S or Mel 111.

Its a bit collecting work.
But perhaps Mr. Thrash has a list already.. [img]smile.gif[/img]

regards,

Mert
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Old May 29th, 2006, 10:09 AM
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Globular clusters are way out there, most orbit the galaxy so there's none anywhere near Sol.

Open Clusters you're a bit better off with, since they're just stars that are clumped together (usually because they form at the same time and place). Though often Open Clusters tend to be rather young because of that - the stars haven't had time to go their separate ways.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_cluster
http://live.yurisnight.net/messier/open.html
http://live.yurisnight.net/messier/glob.html
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Old May 30th, 2006, 03:14 AM
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What I'm looking for is a colonizable cluster. the big question is, when taking into account their age, would they form planetary systems or life?
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Old May 30th, 2006, 03:29 AM
Antony Antony is offline
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Planetary systems probably. We seem to be finding planets all over the place. Life? less likely for "native advanced lifeforms", what we need to do is find an old cluster (are there any still more or less intact?). Anyone know where a list of the estimated ages of open clusters can be found?
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Old May 30th, 2006, 04:21 AM
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Planetary system: why not ?
But as Malenfant stated the open clusters are astronomically young and so planetary systems and planets would be young (just a few hundred million years or so), too.
This could mean, that geological activity is high and atmosphere is still "under" construction (and perhaps without something like an ozon layer).

Maybe not a good place for native life (except is spawned by some ancients) but a fairly intresting environment for a colony [img]smile.gif[/img]
Could be a setting for a vulcan planet or even a rain planet.

Just take a look on earths conditions around 4 billion years ago [img]smile.gif[/img]
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Old May 30th, 2006, 06:41 AM
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Hmmm... So alot of colonies would either be terraformed (think Acheron in Aliens; the first movie had it as a "primordial" world; by the second movie it got terraformed to a level where you could breath the atmosphre, but weather sucks) or have domes and underground tunnels.

And microbial life is interesting - its just that coplex lifeforms are probably going to be brought along with the colonists (and with enough gengineering, the point of "alien" vs "earthlife" becomes quite moot from a game POV).
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Old May 30th, 2006, 10:49 AM
Antony Antony is offline
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Another thing with young systems is the potential for asteroid bombardment. Planets are likely to be in the proverbial shooting gallery which is not condusive to life surving. Earth is believed to have been lucky to survive the earlier phase of this. If I remember correctly the moon is now theorised as having been created when an object the size of Mars impacted the young Earth.
In this regard having large gas giants like Jupiter is probably a bonus as they will sweep up a lot of this material.
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Old May 30th, 2006, 12:43 PM
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The 'shooting gallery' phase is really early on in a system's evolution (like, the first 500 million years or so). After that things tend to calm down vrey rapidly. Though of course the point is that some of these systems may not be older than that anyway...

The Hyades for example are about 150 ly away and are only 790 million years old. That's long enough for planets to form around stars that can have them and after the main bombardment phase. But they still won't be habitable places to live...

The Pleiades are only about 80 million years old and so definitely won't have any worlds that are safe to live on.

http://www.seds.org/messier/xtra/ngc/hyades.html
http://www.seds.org/messier/m/m045.html
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Old May 30th, 2006, 12:52 PM
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This is probably off the topic, but I've been curious about systems like Alpha Centauri A & B plus Proxima so close by. Would'nt that make a hash of those systems?
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