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  #11  
Old November 15th, 2017, 08:12 PM
TheDark TheDark is offline
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Originally Posted by timerover51 View Post
Just checking on what you had.
No worries. I'm always looking for more sources, since I never know when someone will randomly mention something that's of use. I ran into a paper today that made me realize I had misunderstood some numbers - I thought they were one of the inputs into an adhesion formula, but they were actually the result of that formula.

Two little informative tidbits for today:
The equations to calculate Ca are based on boiler pressures of 200 psi for TL3 and 350 psi for TL4, both of which are numbers achieved late in that TL. The actual formula is horsepower = .0212 * boiler pressure * cylinder face area, so if you want to use a different boiler pressure, then the formula for Ca becomes:
Horsepower/(.0212*pressure) = Ca

In metric, rail weight (kilograms/meter) doubled is the tonnes per kilometer (since there are two rails). And, from FF&S, we know iron costs 0.0002 MCr per tonne. So, each kilogram/meter of rail costs .0004 MCr per kilometer; that is, to lay a rail of 50 kilograms/meter of mass means each kilometer of railroad rails costs .002 MCr, and rail of 100 kilograms/meter costs .004 MCr per kilometer.
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Old November 15th, 2017, 10:47 PM
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Originally Posted by TheDark View Post
No worries. I'm always looking for more sources, since I never know when someone will randomly mention something that's of use. I ran into a paper today that made me realize I had misunderstood some numbers - I thought they were one of the inputs into an adhesion formula, but they were actually the result of that formula.

Two little informative tidbits for today:
The equations to calculate Ca are based on boiler pressures of 200 psi for TL3 and 350 psi for TL4, both of which are numbers achieved late in that TL. The actual formula is horsepower = .0212 * boiler pressure * cylinder face area, so if you want to use a different boiler pressure, then the formula for Ca becomes:
Horsepower/(.0212*pressure) = Ca
What is your Earth time frame cut-off for Tech Level 3 and Tech Level 4? In 1860, locomotives were still using rectangular boilers with a pressure of 30 psi made of iron (hence the term "boiler plate"), while in 1900 drum boilers were in use, made of steel, and going up to 250 psi.

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Originally Posted by TheDark View Post
In metric, rail weight (kilograms/meter) doubled is the tonnes per kilometer (since there are two rails). And, from FF&S, we know iron costs 0.0002 MCr per tonne. So, each kilogram/meter of rail costs .0004 MCr per kilometer; that is, to lay a rail of 50 kilograms/meter of mass means each kilometer of railroad rails costs .002 MCr, and rail of 100 kilograms/meter costs .004 MCr per kilometer.
Your rail weight of 50 kilograms per meter is about correct for today, but your higher weight is too high. Also, iron rails will wear out in about 3 to 5 years, while steel rails will last about double that.
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Old November 15th, 2017, 10:52 PM
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Don't forget higher tech locomotives, such as maglev hover or low-power grav.


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Old November 16th, 2017, 06:43 PM
TheDark TheDark is offline
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Originally Posted by timerover51 View Post
What is your Earth time frame cut-off for Tech Level 3 and Tech Level 4? In 1860, locomotives were still using rectangular boilers with a pressure of 30 psi made of iron (hence the term "boiler plate"), while in 1900 drum boilers were in use, made of steel, and going up to 250 psi.
I generally start to transition from 3 to 4 around 1880 (since 4 is "circa 1900" and only lasts until around 1930). The 350 psi for TL4 is from the Baldwin 60000 prototype, which was one of the lowest-pressure superheated steam locomotives (most of which were failures).


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Your rail weight of 50 kilograms per meter is about correct for today, but your higher weight is too high. Also, iron rails will wear out in about 3 to 5 years, while steel rails will last about double that.
If we're talking about in the real world, true, the heaviest mass-produced steel rails were 77 kg/m monsters used by the PRR. That wouldn't necessarily limit someone on another planet. Rail material will be more detailed later (assuming I don't get distracted too much by paying work and other projects). Historically, mechanically-powered railroads started with wood and strap-iron, moved to solid iron in the 1840s, and then steel in the mid-to-late-1860s. Some iron rails wore out in three months on the PRR. When the Chalk Farm Bridge near London tested steel rails on the same line as iron rails, the wear was found to be roughly 1/17th as much for steel.

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Don't forget higher tech locomotives, such as maglev hover or low-power grav.
I should get there eventually, but I need to get the basics first before moving on.
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