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2300AD & 2320 Discussion of the original 2300AD from GDW, the revised 2300 from Mongoose Publishing, or QLI's 2320AD.

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  #11  
Old April 26th, 2004, 05:36 AM
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We have the example of meteorites that allegedly came from Mars. Heavy bolide bombardment could scour a smaller planet's surface and provide mineral enrichment for a nearby asteroid belt.
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  #12  
Old April 26th, 2004, 09:34 AM
womble womble is offline
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The fragments hurled into space by a serious impact wouldn't be very large, I'd imagine. Compared to the total mass out there, they'd be vanishingly hard to find.
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Old April 26th, 2004, 07:35 PM
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But we must speculate on what sort of TL-25 to 30 handwavium weaponry was being used in the Ancient's War. Perhaps multi-thousand kilometer long, stasis-field jacketed, monomolecular strands were used to slice a planet up, followed by rapid fire bombardment of the remaining chunks with neutronium cannons (firing golf ball size masses of the material found on neutron stars). That should procduce lots of convenient chunks floating all over the place, with the impacts serving to distribute the belt (but blowing most of the material out-system, where they might have either left stellar orbit entirely, or been caught in the outer Oort orbits. But even though accretion could begin again immediately, is 300,000 years enough to reverse that kind of damage? Wouldn't most of the chunks be floating around in the orbit slot, inching closer to one another across considerable distances (our asteriod belt is mostly empty space, after all).

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  #14  
Old May 17th, 2004, 11:13 AM
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Also, the first thing that happes when you start whamming asteroids into planets is that the crust melts, destroying most of your complex minerals and returning them to an undifferentiated melt. If you wallop a planet hard enough to shatter it, it shatters in a liquid form, as the energy tramsmission is quiet sufficent to render the solid into a liquid.

It is the act of planet forming, and the slow cooling and subsequent differentiation of that melt, that lets late-melt forming minerals appear. Smaller asteroidal bodies cool too quickly for the really interesting minerals to form.

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Old May 19th, 2004, 03:07 AM
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Undifferentiated is not the same as homogenous; a gob of molten planetstuff can still have a concentration of Ta far above cosmological average.
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  #16  
Old May 21st, 2004, 06:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Straybow:
Undifferentiated is not the same as homogenous; a gob of molten planetstuff can still have a concentration of Ta far above cosmological average.
Indeed it could. However energy sufficent to reduce a planet to plantessimals and then blast them appart with sufficent force to overcome their own mutual gravitational attraction will reduce the planet to a homegenous melt, and will vapourise a good deal of it anyway, which will then condense again as more homogenised melt.

It is the subsequent cooling process which allows the molten tantalum (and other minerals) to form into crystals. One of the major differences between planitessimals and planets is that a planet has sufficent size and mass to retain longer term heat, firstly by attracting other planitessimals which het the main body during impact, and later by radiogenic decay. This longer term heat allows the differentiation process to take place, and the formation of late melt complex minerals.

The proinciple ore of Tantalum is Tantalite, although there are about 20 other tantalum bearing minerals. Tantalite is typically found in pegmatites and other deep crustal rocks which have been upthrust. Its apperance in these massively grained, and hence high tempratyure and pressure deep rocks, shows how it requires a long cooling process to form, and would need a significant impact of a planet to be found in planetessimals.

Smaller planitessimals, whilst they would retain the gross chemical make up of a larger body, would differ in chemistry considerably. However, even if they did form from a Ta rich melt, the melts will still cool much quicker, stunting crystal growth and mineral formation. The Ta would remain locked in a chemically enriched groundmass, whilst the earlier melt minerals such as nickle, iron and so on will form the bulk of the economically viable mineralisation.

G.
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  #17  
Old October 3rd, 2008, 12:13 AM
ryanrulz37 ryanrulz37 is offline
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There are different types of tantalum minerals, of which tantalite is the most important. But microlite, wodginite, euxenite, polycrase, samarskite and fergusonite are also tantalum minerals. Tantalite has the same mineral structure as columbite, and when there is more tantalum than niobite it is called tantalite, and when there is more niobite than tantalum it is called columbite or niobite. In Africa the two minerals are equally refered to as coltan, and according to the United States Geological Survey the Democratic Republic of Congo produced less than 1% of the world's tantalum for the past four years.

Currently by far the world's largest producer of tantalum is Australia, with Brazil, Canada, China, Ethiopia and Mozambique also producing significant quantities of tantalum. Tantalum is also produced in Thailand and Malaysia as a by-product of tin mining and smelting. Other future sources of tantalum may be found in Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Greenland, the USA and Finland.
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  #18  
Old October 4th, 2008, 06:32 AM
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We know from 1st edition that tantalum has pretty much gone from the Earth, it was some valuable that prettymuch every grade of ore was used, they even mined under the Antarctic. Where the tantalum was is primarily a historic question in 2k3 (or 2k32).
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Old October 4th, 2008, 01:02 PM
Waldemar Waldemar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMonnery View Post
We know from 1st edition that tantalum has pretty much gone from the Earth, it was some valuable that prettymuch every grade of ore was used, they even mined under the Antarctic. Where the tantalum was is primarily a historic question in 2k3 (or 2k32).
There seems to be some deposits left on Earth.

In the various descriptions of the Tantalum War we learn that Indonesia got so much tantalum reserves from Bengal that they could build and maintain a trade fleet. In 2320 AD we learn that the amount found in the Andaman Sea was less than Indonesia hade expected.

Spain traded its reserves, but on Earth/Cybertech Sourcebook page 51 we learn that some small scale extraction is still left. Portugal seems to have some minor deposits too.

Azania seems to have some deposits left, and the Central Asian Republic is believed to have large reserves waiting to be mined. On page 56 in the Earth/Cybertech Sourcebook it seems to have been one of the reasons for the Central Asian War. Manchuria is also stated to have some reserves.

Mozambique is the nation that tantalum built. This is not mentioned in 2320 AD, where Mozambique is put as Tier 4 nation without much comment. The description of Mozambique of a very rich nation could still be valid though, and with Mozambique still in possession of vast reserves of tantalum. It does pose some concerns of how well the tier system measures a nations position in world politics.

Finally in 2320 AD Iran is stated to have some small reserves on page 64, there are rumours of Uruguay have some small reserves on page 59 and Antarctica is described on page 69 as not having been prospected for tantalum yet.
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  #20  
Old October 4th, 2008, 02:39 PM
BMonnery BMonnery is offline
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We know the 2300 distribution of tantalum, and the Andaman sea deposit wasn't sufficient for building either a merchant or cruiser GG1 unit, it was enough for a survey or frigate unit.

In fact the apparent amounts of Ta seem to be totally inadequate for the expansion that occurred, so I guess a lot was found offworld. Indeed, the Clarke's star article mentions those that got a toehold in space "ripping apart" planets for Ta, it was that valuable.

2320 might say Antarctica hasn't been explored yet. GDW said otherwise, the British fought several pseudo-wars to grab the Greenland and Antarctic Ta. GDW was clear, 74 tantalum strikes were made on Earth, they've all been mined out. There is hope that others will be found, but no mining is occurring.
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