View Single Post
  #3  
Old February 25th, 2014, 02:24 AM
timerover51's Avatar
timerover51 timerover51 is offline
Citizen: SOC-14
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: North of Chicago
Posts: 5,165
Gallery : 0
Visit timerover51's Blog
timerover51 Respected Citizentimerover51 Respected Citizentimerover51 Respected Citizentimerover51 Respected Citizentimerover51 Respected Citizentimerover51 Respected Citizentimerover51 Respected Citizentimerover51 Respected Citizen
Default

Quote:
Scientific American Supplement, No. 711, August 17, 1889:

LIGHT STEAM ENGINE FOR AERIAL FLYERS.

We here illustrate one of a couple of compound engines designed and constructed by Messrs. Ahrbecker, Son & Hamkens, of Stamford Street, S.E., for Captain Mojaisky, of the Russian Imperial Navy, who intends to use them for aeronautical purposes. The larger of these engines has cylinders 3 in. and 7 in. in diameter and 5 in. stroke, and when making 300 revolutions per minute it develops 20 actual horse power, while its weight is but 105 lbs. The smaller engine--the one illustrated--has cylinders 2 in. and 5 in. in diameter, and 3 in. stroke, and weighs 63 lbs., while when making 450 revolutions it develops 10 actual horse power.

The two engines are identical in design, and are constructed of forged steel with the exception of the bearings, connecting-rods, crossheads, slide valves and pumps, which are of phosphor-bronze. The cylinders, with the steam passages, etc., are shaped out of the solid. The standards, as will be seen, are of very light T steel, the crankshafts and pins are hollow, as are also the crosshead bolts and piston rods. The small engine drives a single-acting air pump of the ordinary type by a crank, not shown in the drawing. The condenser is formed of a series of hollow gratings.

Image of Engines is Here: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/8297/.../images/3a.png

Steam is supplied to the two engines by one boiler of the Herreshoff steam generator type, with certain modifications, introduced by the designers, to insure the utmost certainty in working. It is of steel, the outside dimensions being 22 in. in diameter, 25 in. high, and weighs 142 lb. The fuel used is petroleum, and the working pressure 190 lb. per square inch.

The constructors consider the power developed by these engines very moderate, on account of the low piston speed specified in this particular case. In some small and light engines by the same makers the piston speed is as high as 1000 ft. per minute. The engines now illustrated form an interesting example of special designing, and Messrs. Ahrbecker, Son, and Hamkens deserve much credit for the manner in which the work has been turned out, the construction of such light engines involving many practical difficulties,--Engineering.
Note: The article actually appeared in the Scientific American Supplement, No. 286 June 25, 1881. I changed the date to make it a bit more relevant to the timing of the game. The original article may be read here.
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/8297/8297-h/8297-h.htm
__________________
Link to Piper Sector: http://www.zarthani.net/ridder-mankind_to_the_stars.htm
Do you have a security clearance? New Blog Post. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ElI451TxsTg, 3:24 in.
I march to my own set of bagpipes. Caution: This individual thinks that studying logistics is FUN.

Nail to the mast her holy flag,
Set every threadbare sail,
And give her to the god of storms,
The lightning and the gale!
Reply With Quote