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-   -   The Rebellion and World War One? (http://www.travellerrpg.com/CotI/Discuss/showthread.php?t=11223)

mike wightman March 28th, 2005 03:19 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by daryen:
My biggest problem with Dulinor is that his plan was crap. The right of assassination only works if you keep Capital. If you don't have the fleets needed to hold Capital, you shouldn't be killing the Emperor.

So, as smart as Dulinor might have been, as reasonable as his justifications may have been, his plan was flat out stupid, and doomed to catastrophe.

He should have taken his Coronation Fleet to Capital in 1116, not in 1130.

I sometimes wonder if Dulinor set his plan in motion too quickly.

Perhaps he saw an opportunity in the throne room that day and brought all his plans forward - instead of waiting the extra few years to build up his fleet strength.

I wonder if he could get black globe equipped warships?

mike wightman March 28th, 2005 03:19 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by daryen:
My biggest problem with Dulinor is that his plan was crap. The right of assassination only works if you keep Capital. If you don't have the fleets needed to hold Capital, you shouldn't be killing the Emperor.

So, as smart as Dulinor might have been, as reasonable as his justifications may have been, his plan was flat out stupid, and doomed to catastrophe.

He should have taken his Coronation Fleet to Capital in 1116, not in 1130.

I sometimes wonder if Dulinor set his plan in motion too quickly.

Perhaps he saw an opportunity in the throne room that day and brought all his plans forward - instead of waiting the extra few years to build up his fleet strength.

I wonder if he could get black globe equipped warships?

jalberti March 28th, 2005 07:09 AM

I am not sure about too quickly, but what foiled his plan is three things: first, Lucan survived, second, sections of the Imperium reacted very negatively to his assasination, and third, the "real" Strephon was not killed.

Since the plan did not successfully take care of all of these, the Rebellion had to happen.

In my readings in Survial Margin, I do take Dulinor as a man with a conscious and I do think he would be disturbed by all the death that has occurred as a result of his actions. He would either let it consume him, or try to justify it. I think it would be the latter. I think the blame would be placed on Lucan.

jalberti March 28th, 2005 07:09 AM

I am not sure about too quickly, but what foiled his plan is three things: first, Lucan survived, second, sections of the Imperium reacted very negatively to his assasination, and third, the "real" Strephon was not killed.

Since the plan did not successfully take care of all of these, the Rebellion had to happen.

In my readings in Survial Margin, I do take Dulinor as a man with a conscious and I do think he would be disturbed by all the death that has occurred as a result of his actions. He would either let it consume him, or try to justify it. I think it would be the latter. I think the blame would be placed on Lucan.

jalberti March 28th, 2005 07:09 AM

I am not sure about too quickly, but what foiled his plan is three things: first, Lucan survived, second, sections of the Imperium reacted very negatively to his assasination, and third, the "real" Strephon was not killed.

Since the plan did not successfully take care of all of these, the Rebellion had to happen.

In my readings in Survial Margin, I do take Dulinor as a man with a conscious and I do think he would be disturbed by all the death that has occurred as a result of his actions. He would either let it consume him, or try to justify it. I think it would be the latter. I think the blame would be placed on Lucan.

jcrocker March 28th, 2005 09:49 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Diocletian:

Since the plan did not successfully take care of all of these, the Rebellion had to happen.

...and if his plan was deficient, whose fault is that?

Quote:


I think the blame would be placed on Lucan.
One thing there is never any shortage of, is blame. If Dulinor had pulled it off, he'd have been an underhanded bastard, but he'd have been emperor. Since he didn't, he and Lucan [and others] get to share the moral fault for sending tens of billions of Imperial subjects to their deaths. Not something most people want on their tombstone.

jcrocker March 28th, 2005 09:49 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Diocletian:

Since the plan did not successfully take care of all of these, the Rebellion had to happen.

...and if his plan was deficient, whose fault is that?

Quote:


I think the blame would be placed on Lucan.
One thing there is never any shortage of, is blame. If Dulinor had pulled it off, he'd have been an underhanded bastard, but he'd have been emperor. Since he didn't, he and Lucan [and others] get to share the moral fault for sending tens of billions of Imperial subjects to their deaths. Not something most people want on their tombstone.

jcrocker March 28th, 2005 09:49 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Diocletian:

Since the plan did not successfully take care of all of these, the Rebellion had to happen.

...and if his plan was deficient, whose fault is that?

Quote:


I think the blame would be placed on Lucan.
One thing there is never any shortage of, is blame. If Dulinor had pulled it off, he'd have been an underhanded bastard, but he'd have been emperor. Since he didn't, he and Lucan [and others] get to share the moral fault for sending tens of billions of Imperial subjects to their deaths. Not something most people want on their tombstone.

daryen March 28th, 2005 10:24 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Diocletian:
I am not sure about too quickly, but what foiled his plan is three things: first, Lucan survived, second, sections of the Imperium reacted very negatively to his assasination, and third, the "real" Strephon was not killed.
No, the real problem was that he didn't have sufficient forces to hold Capital.

Had he killed "Stephon" (real or clone, doesn't matter) and held Capital, then the survival of Lucan is merely a setback, as that "problem" would quickly be corrected.

And once he had Capital, whether Strephon was real or not would be of no consequence. He would still have to fend off the Solomani and Vargr, and Margaret would have been a problem, but the rest of the Imperium would likely have fallen into line quickly enough.

Lucan's survival was merely a red herring. Dulinor screwed up by not making sure he could keep Capital.

daryen March 28th, 2005 10:24 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Diocletian:
I am not sure about too quickly, but what foiled his plan is three things: first, Lucan survived, second, sections of the Imperium reacted very negatively to his assasination, and third, the "real" Strephon was not killed.
No, the real problem was that he didn't have sufficient forces to hold Capital.

Had he killed "Stephon" (real or clone, doesn't matter) and held Capital, then the survival of Lucan is merely a setback, as that "problem" would quickly be corrected.

And once he had Capital, whether Strephon was real or not would be of no consequence. He would still have to fend off the Solomani and Vargr, and Margaret would have been a problem, but the rest of the Imperium would likely have fallen into line quickly enough.

Lucan's survival was merely a red herring. Dulinor screwed up by not making sure he could keep Capital.


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