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Creation Date: October 28th, 2017 09:28 PM
Timerover51 Timerover51 is offline
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My Daily (sort of) Thoughts on Various Topics. Not Politically Correct.
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In Moot Member Blogs Armenian Genocide Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #210 New April 26th, 2020 08:30 PM
A couple of days ago was the commemorative day for the Armenian Genocide attempted by the Turks during World War One. While the Turks fiercely deny that anything took place, the evidence is overwhelming that it did. Just put Armenia into the search of Project Gutenberg, and look at the results. Then do the same at archive.org. There are quite a few people of Armenian descent in my area, including the orthodontist that worked with my two children.

The thing that struck me in going through the material is that the massacres in World War One were nothing new. The Turks, with the assistance of the Kurds, had been slaughtering Armenians dating back into the late 1800s, where there is documentation. How much before that is a good question, but the attempted genocide in World War One was simply the most massive and organized effort. The following are some quotes from a book written by an American women who was in Turkey prior to World War One, which can be found on Project Gutenberg, Red Rugs of Tarsus.

Quote:
But recent events in Armenia brought it all back again. My indignation, and a sense of duty and of pity, transcended all personal feelings. I lived again that night in Tarsus, when we—seven defenseless women, our one foreign man a brave young Swiss teacher of French, and 4,800 Armenians waited our turn at the hands of the Kurds.
Quote:
In Tarsus we went through the massacres of April, 1909, when thirty thousand Armenians were slaughtered by the Turks in Adana Province alone. My first baby was born on May 5th that year, under martial law, in a little Armenian town that was only saved from similar experiences by the protecting guns of the warships of seven nations.
Then there is this from the book, Germany, Turkey, and Armenia, published in 1917, also to be found on Project Gutenberg. This was written by a German teacher in Aleppo.

Quote:
On my return in September, 1915, from Beirut to Aleppo, after a three months’ holiday, I heard, to my horror, that a new period of Armenian massacres had been initiated. I was told that they were far more terrible than those under Abdul Hamid; and that their object was to exterminate, root and branch, the intelligent, prosperous and progressive nation of the Armenians and to transfer their property to Turkish hands. (Emphasis Added)
Quote:
Opposite to the German Technical School at Aleppo in which we do our work as teachers, a remnant of some of these convoys is lying in one of the hans; there are about 400 emaciated forms; about 100 boys and girls, from five to seven years old, are among them. Most of them are suffering from typhoid and dysentery.
Quote:
How can we teachers read German fairy tales with our pupils, or, indeed, the story of the Good Samaritan in the Bible? How can we ask them to decline and conjugate indifferent words, while round about in the neighbouring yards the starving brothers and sisters of our Armenian pupils are succumbing to a lingering death? In these circumstances our educational work flies in the face of all true morality and becomes a mockery of human feeling.
(Emphasis Added)
There are no pictures or photos in these accounts, which might be a good thing. I suspect if there were, they would resemble the photos taken by the U.S. 7th Army when it liberated the Dachau Concentration Camp. That report can be found online at the Combined Arms Research Library Digital Library, https://cgsc.contentdm.oclc.org/. It might take you a while to find it as the URL keeps changing as more World War 2 documents are added, but it is under World War 2. Once I get my website running better, I will start posting some of the reports there for free download.

However, spend a little while during the lockdown reading this material, and then consider the evil which men can do, of their own free will, and in some cases, with great enthusiasm and enjoyment.
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